The Yearbooks of the Estonian Librarians Association 2010

SUMMARIES
 

Year of Reading. One among Many
Kai Idarand, National Library of Estonia, Research and Development Centre, Leading Specialist

Library – Intellectual Home for a Child
Mika Keränen, Children’s Author

High School Students and Obligatory Literature
Stiina Sild, Tallinn Central Library, Department of Estonian Literature, Librarian

Simply Talking about Reading : a Panel Discussion
Helen Pärna, Academic Library of Tallinn University, Subject Librarian

Books on to a Second Round
Lea Lehtmets, Lääne-Viru County Central Library, Leading Specialist

Gift a Library with a Book!
Katre Riisalu, The Estonian Librarians Association, Vice-president

Library, Copyright and Internet
Toomas Seppel, Estonian Ministry of Culture, Media and Copyright Department, Adviser

Estonian Research Libraries in Progress: Estonian e-Repository on the Estonian Research Infrastructures Roadmap
Andres Kollist, Academic Library of Tallinn University, Director, Cand. Sc. in chemistry

On the Road to the Estonian Digital Library. Electronic Services of Research Libraries
Ruth Pääsuke, Tallinn University, Institute of Information Studies, Lecturer

Estonian Research Libraries: in Good Times and through Economic Crisis
Kate-Riin Kont, Tallinn University of Technology Library, Head of Acquisition Department, Tallinn University, PhD student

Electronic Scholarly Publications in the Context of Information Needs Expressed by Tallinn University Doctoral Students
Silvi Metsar, Tallinn University, Institute of Information Studies, Lecturer
Gea Lepp, Tallinn University, master’s student

Several Decades Later than the very Beginning
Mare Lott, Professor Emeritus at Tallinn University

The Beginning Years of Professional Courses for Librarians
Silvi Roomets, Associate Professor Emeritus at Tallinn University, Head of the Information Work Learning Centre at Tallinn Pedagogical University 1997–1999

Professional Knowledge Has always Been Highly Estimated in Librarianship
Krista Talvi, National Library of Estonia, Research and Development Centre, Professional Training Coordinator

Summer Academies Organized by Viljandi Culture Academy
Ilmar Vaaro, University of Tartu Viljandi Culture Academy, Information Studies Department, Lecturer in Librarianship The Estonian Librarians Association, Head of the Committee on Education
Ülle Rüütel, Viljandi City Library, Children’s Service Leading Specialist

The History of Public Libraries in Finland
Vesa Kautt, University of Oulu, Principal Librarian, PhD

Laureate of the ELA's Prize for Merits 2010 – Ivi Tingre
Elle Tarik, Tartu Public Library, Librarian

Laureate of the ELA's Annual Prize 2010 – Külli Solo
Ülle Talihärm, National Library of Estonia, Director of Collections

Laureate of the Children’s Librarian of the Year 2010 Award – Eve Timmi
Heidi Ratas, Võru County Central Library, Librarian

Laureate of the School Librarian of the Year 2010 Award – Vaike Mändmaa
Eve Rahkema, Tallinn Laagna Gymnasium, Librarian

Special Library Deed of the Year 2010 – Founding the Traditional Music Centre Library
Tiina Soopa, Estonian Traditional Music Center Library, Administrator

Research Library Deed of the Year 2010 – Creation of an Electronic Directory for Open Access Collections at Tallinn University of Technology
Rait Aguraijuja, Tallinn University of Technology Library, IT Services Department, System Operator

Activities of the Estonian Librarians Association in 2010

ELNET Consortium in 2010
Mare-Nelli Ilus, Consortium of Estonian Libraries Network, Executive Director

Activities of the Estonian Music Library Association in 2010
Kaie Viigipuu-Kreintaal, Tallinn Central Library, Head of the Music Department, Estonina Music Library Association, President

 

  

Year of Reading. One among Many

Kai Idarand

National Library of Estonia, Research and Development Centre, Leading Specialist

 The year 2010 was designated the National Year of Reading in Estonia. The objective of the thematic year was to bring reading into sharper focus and to counteract the decreasing trend in reading habits. Whilst the year was of great significance for libraries, librarians as a whole were quite favourably inclined to go along with the idea. This article is based on the answers provided within a questionnaire, which was conducted among chief specialists of libraries towards the end of the year.

Additionally to various traditional activities for promotion of reading, the National Year of Reading involved a considerable number of undertakings specifically devised for the Year, which could in all probability start a new tradition (interactive literary evenings, late night libraries, dance shows, book fairs, etc.). The Year of Reading witnessed the strengthening of collaborative relations between libraries and schools, escalation of joint activities with several other institutions and organizations as well as formation of multiple new connections. The Year of Reading was in research and special libraries primarily visible in the form of book exhibitions. Meetings with authors were the most awaited events for users in public libraries. Several events were in accord with the present-day work habits conducted by electronic means. Among others mention should be made of online publications and the use of social media to communicate the activities of libraries to the public.

Children were definitely the audience to gain most from the Year of Reading and a huge variety of enterprises for all the age groups were arranged by school libraries. Drawing attention to the importance of reading was particularly advantageous for children and proved to yield good results all in all.

Topics related to books and reading appeared more frequently on the media, where as local journalists appeared to be especially interested in library happenings and enthusiastic to write about them as well.

An observable rise of interest towards reading among the public gives evidence that the National Year of Reading has achieved its purpose.

 

 

 Library – Intellectual Home for a Child

Mika Keränen

Children’s Author

In his opening speech for the Library Days the author affectionately brings back to memory his childhood library of the 1980ies in Helsinki. Since the number of books in the home was very small at that time, the district library became, according to the author, an intellectual home for him. Whereas in the beginning he was more inclined to prefer adventure stories and detective novels, however, a whole new world started to open up for him through adolescent series literature, travel books and reference works soon enough, as he got a little older. During the entire summertime, while staying at his grandmother’s and uncle’s house in the countryside, he would be anxiously awaiting the receipt of parcels posted by the Book Club.

The author is convinced that books ought to be accessible for each and every child. He himself enjoys purchasing books for his family. A library should be located within a short distance from a child’s home and should definitely be staffed by a bright-eyed and knowledgeable librarian. Up-to-date technical solutions are not capable of substituting a library employee, who would provide assistance with making choices in the world of books to children keen on reading.

 

 

 High School Students and Obligatory Literature

Stiina Sild

Tallinn Central Library, Department of Estonian Literature, Librarian

The article is based on the results of a questionnaire conducted by the author within her baccalaureate seminar studies under the title “Obligatory literature and its impact on reading”, defended in 2010 at the Institute of Information Studies, Tallinn University.

Feedback was obtained from 103 high school students of the 9th and 11th grades at the Jakob Westholm Gymnasium as well as their teachers of literature. Results of earlier similar surveys conducted by other undergraduate students among schoolchildren elsewhere, are provided for comparison.

Although high school students are rather reluctant to read obligatory literature, they are well able to comprehend its correlation to becoming an educated person. Some of the young people are reading exclusively to get good marks. When preparing for reading tests quite a few young people are used to drawing on book summaries – obtained from the Internet or composed by a more diligent classmate. As a rule, a student borrows a selected book on the obligatory literature list from a school or public library. As they are not always over-enthused to search several libraries for a book, they are inclined to remain waiting for the book to be returned by another user at a particular library of their choice.

Students prefer to read novels, short stories and stories. Poetry is read less enthusiastically. Favourite authors and literary works originate from the list of obligatory literature or are related to their childhood. During recent years the list of favourite authors has been supplemented by quite a number of new names – Mihkel Raud, Joanne Kathleen Rowling and Stephanie Meyer.

Teachers have developed an unduly positive attitude towards their students as to the standard of their reading habits and book preferences. At the same time they are fully aware that today’s young people abstain from reading any more than they are directly obligated. The younger generation finds a wide variety of options offered by television, friends, the Internet and other multimedia far more attractive.

 

 

 Simply Talking about Reading : a Panel Discussion

Helen Pärna

Academic Library of Tallinn University, Subject Librarian

Teachers and librarians of Harju County, who in their everyday work have closest contact with younger and older readers alike, came together on the occasion of the Year of Reading. The selection of topics for interviews followed from the Year of Reading celebrated in 2010 and its leading ideas. To survive in the fast-growing information society, a person is expected to have a wide variety of skills, whereas functional or coping literacy is among the key competencies. Among the subjects brought into sharper focus in the Year of Reading were: shaping the reading habits of the young, knowledge of literature, cooperation between organizations. Interviews with participants likewise touched upon all those issues. They also held discussions over other intriguing questions, e.g. which factors could be at the bottom of a perception we call “the pleasure of reading”, whether alluring people to reading was altogether possible and what accomplishments had been attained in the course of the Year of Reading.

 

 

 Books on to a Second Round

Lea Lehtmets

Lääne-Viru County Central Library, Leading Specialist

Libraries all over Estonia made their notable contribution to delivering affordable reading matter into the hands of booklovers. Librarians organized various activities for spreading of books, incl. free giveaways, sales, fairs of different orientation, etc. Among the books that found a new owner were discarded items of library holdings as well as literary works that had become redundant at people’s homes and were awaiting other readers. Although these activities were now and then prepared and conducted on the initiative and responsibility of libraries alone, succeeding in a large-scale effort was however considered to be largely preconditioned by participation within the programme of a major local event.

For the purpose of selling or distributing books for free quite a few libraries took advantage of local community big events either at municipal, parish or any other level.

 

 

 Gift a Library with a Book!

Katre Riisalu

The Estonian Librarians Association, Vice-president

The Estonian Librarians Association has in the course of its longstanding activities addressed the public with a variety of communications and statements. The Reading Year’s appeal “Gift a Library with a Book” is definitely an initiative to have attracted the highest degree of public attention so far. The idea to put out the call arose from among the common people, who wished to make their contribution to the libraries as a token of their support and compassion at the time of strenuous economic conditions. The analysis of feedback indicated that libraries in general held a positive opinion towards the outcome and considered the effort rewarding. Books had been gifted in singles, by the dozen and even by the hundred, whereas quite a few libraries remained empty-handed. Several libraries noted that they did not go along with the call, but had still received a good selection of literary classics as donations.

In defiance of all the favourable aspects, the comments conveyed an astonishingly high amount of discontentment and the tendency was most expressly detectable in the responses of librarians. According to remarks on feedback sheets, appeals of that kind should never be made again as the public could get an impression that a visitor was expected to bring along a gift any time when coming to a library.

My intention was to cast a backwards glance to the appeal that had been made by the ELA and to show that it had succeeded in reaching out to quite a few fellow people, offering them an opportunity of showing compassion to libraries.

 

 

 Library, Copyright and Internet

Toomas Seppel

Estonian Ministry of Culture, Media and Copyright Department, Adviser

Copyright regulations have become hardly comprehensible to libraries due to rapid development of digitizing and the Internet. This applies to Estonia as well as other European countries.

The article gives an explanation of the rules for digitizing books and accompanying restrictions imposed by the copyright law. It also considers the issue, whether a library is authorized to make digitized library items available on the Internet. What are the rights of a library with regard to lending audio and video materials? The article also touches on the digitizing aspects regarding out of print and orphan works. In addition to the aforesaid the article provides comments on recent copyright-related developments and practices. The opportunities of libraries under currently effective legislation are comparatively restrained, e.g. libraries are only permitted to make limited portions of book content available for public on the Internet, specifically with a view to introducing exhibitions and collections.

Estonian libraries have the right to unrestricted lending of books and audio materials, whereas a prior consent of the author is required for lending video materials.

The article further discusses a draft legislation, which is intended to provide the principles for accumulating preprint files in the future. The purpose of the amendment is to extend the application of existing legal deposit provisions to preprint files. The transfer and administration of preprint files is designed to be performed online and the National Library of Estonia is authorized to maintain the corresponding software and database.

Accumulating preprint files would afford to save time and money on digitizing in the future. Open access to preprint files would basically depend on which kind of restrictions copyright owners are going to apply on them.

 

 

 Estonian Research Libraries in Progress: Estonian e-Repository on the Estonian Research Infrastructures Roadmap

Andres Kollist

Academic Library of Tallinn University, Director, Cand. Sc. in chemistry

The article focuses on the research libraries' project “Estonian e-Repository and Conservation of Collections” and its inclusion in the Estonian Research Infrastructures Roadmap. The Roadmap is a long term (10-20 years) planning instrument that lists research infrastructures of national importance and will be used as an input for the investment decisions.

The project “Estonian e-Repository and Conservation of Collections” has several objectives. Among them, creating a portal acting as an universal interface to allow combined searching of all memory institutions' portals and accessing the aggregate resources of those institutions – digitized collections, e-databases and scholarly literature. The e-Repository follows the example of digital libraries in Finland and France, whose scale and cost serve as a basis for estimating the projected expenses of the Estonian project. It is intended to enhance the capability to digitize printed publications and audio-visual documents in the course of the project. Google is certainly a pioneer in large-scale digitization and on this landscape it is collaborating with libraries of leading universities. Information and experiences on the Google digitization project have been shared with the author of the article by his colleagues from the libraries of the Michigan and Stanford universities.

The other half of the e-Repository project is dealing with conservation of documents. For that purpose, it is intended to establish a neutralization centre for acidic paper. Paper acidity and the concomitant decay problem are pertaining to publications deriving from the 19th and 20th centuries. One possibility of reducing axidity involves neutralization of an acid with ultra-fine magnesium oxide particles.

 

 

 On the Road to the Estonian Digital Library. Electronic Services of Research Libraries

Ruth Pääsuke

Tallinn University, Institute of Information Studies, Lecturer

Libraries hold a primary responsibility to ensure equal access to information for everybody and to facilitate lifelong learning. Expertly selected information resources are gaining importance in building a knowledge-based society as well as in enhancing the development potential and competitiveness of separate states.

In Estonian libraries the proportion of e-collections is showing a growing tendency beside the traditional hard copy publications. The National Library of Estonia has become a competence centre for digitation and storage of e-collections. For that purpose it has developed a solid technological basis and acquired respective know-how. By now, various digital collections have been established at Estonian research and memory institutions, whereas the amount of electronically available resources and services is growing year by year. This state of affairs leads to the question, whether it is reasonable, considering the recent developments, to speak of a digital library or is the process merely bearing witness to an increase in the proportion and impact of e-services among all library functions?

The article seeks to analyze variant definitions of digital library and to explore the nature of electronic library services. It also characterizes, on ground of information openly viewable and accessible via the websites of libraries, particular e-services afforded by Estonian research libraries.

 

 

 Estonian Research Libraries: in Good Times and through Economic Crisis

Kate-Riin Kont

Tallinn University of Technology Library, Head of Acquisition Department Tallinn University, PhD student

Annual allocations from the budget of the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research to Estonian research libraries for acquisition of scholarly information resources and joint purchase of research databases had been steadily growing until 2008. On the whole, libraries were evidently making solid progress – the amount of electronic holdings as well as the funding for their acquisition was growing by the year. Nevertheless, when in 2009 the consequences of the global economic crisis became manifest in Estonia, a considerable decline in subsidies it brought upon. The subsidies for acquisition of new library items were drastically declined – the funding factually dropped to the level of 2004 and in 2010 could barely reach the level of 2007.

A slightly varying story pertains to the funding allocated for joint purchase of databases, which was renamed the programme for electronic research information “E-teadusinfo” at the end of 2009. Elaboration of the programme was co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund. Therefore, joint provision of electronic research information is funded specifically through this programme in the period 2009–2012. Funding of electronic databases from the state budget shall be resumed from 2013 onward pursuant to an agreement with the Ministry of Education and Research.

Research libraries are before long expected to tackle another reform in the area of legal deposit copy: the Ministry of Culture and the National Library of Estonia have prepared a Draft Legal Deposit Amendment Act, implying substantial reorganization of the regulation.

The motion to reduce the number of legal deposit copies that was made by publishers in 2009, has brought about a feeling of instability among research libraries. Reduction of the number of legal deposit copies would be a considerable loss for libraries. Furthermore, it would also prove disadvantageous for publishers – the conditions for storage and preservation of Estonian national printed matter have been steadily improved in the majority of Estonian libraries, thus allowing for secured preservation of their publications with higher quality and longer duration in the greatest possible number of research libraries.

 

 

 Electronic Scholarly Publications in the Context of Information Needs Expressed by Tallinn University Doctoral Students

Silvi Metsar

Tallinn University, Institute of Information Studies, Lecturer

Gea Lepp

Tallinn University, master’s student

The article gives an overview of a survey conducted in 2009 by the Institute of Information Studies of Tallinn University. The objective of the study was to establish whether and how electronic scholarly publications were used by the doctoral students of Tallinn University as well as to find out their assessment of accessibility options. The results of the study indicated that an overwhelming majority of respondents were active users of electronic materials.

Among major advantages of using e-resources they mentioned the convenience and swiftness of access to information, its serviceability, economy of time, lack of location or time restraints.

A greater part of the respondents noted that they would consent to manage without hard copy publications on condition that they were guaranteed effectual and exhaustive access to necessary e-resources.

The analysis of responses revealed that doctoral students were in need of additional user training and better informedness.

 

 

 Several Decades Later than the very Beginning

Mare Lott

Professor Emeritus at Tallinn University

Professor Emeritus of Tallinn University Mare Lott in her colourful and expressive reminiscences looks back on the second half of the 1960ies, when professional training of librarians had been transferred from the University of Tartu to Tallinn Pedagogical Institute. Classes were held in an old wooden house, seven lecturers who had commenced working formed the core of the chair. The study programme originated from Moscow as was typical in the centralized system of the Soviet times. Under the influence of the Russian ideology it was in every way aimed to restrain the proportional growth of certain disciplines such as the Estonian national sciences, foreign literature and foreign languages in the curriculum. Vocational subjects were in principle divided into three groups: general subjects in the field of study, specialization disciplines and practical training. It is a noteworthy fact that during that period a foundation was laid for conducting curricular practical training for undergraduate students at larger libraries in Moscow and Leningrad, afterwards in Vilnius and Riga as well. Regardless of the encountered difficulties, the author of the article characterizes the decade as a time filled with optimism, resourcefulness and joy of discovery.

 

 

 The Beginning Years of Professional Courses for Librarians

Silvi Roomets

Associate Professor Emeritus at Tallinn University,

Head of the Information Work Learning Centre at Tallinn Pedagogical University 1997–1999

The article contains a retrospective survey of a time span (1997–1999) witnessing the commencement of regularly organized professional courses for librarians. In 1997 a clearly specified objective was established to organize professional courses for librarians as a cycle of four times with duration of one week in Tallinn and two weeks in Tartu. Preparatory activities for starting the courses were performed by the Information Work Learning Centre at Tallinn Pedagogical University.

The overview among other issues pertaining to the lectures provides information on the funding practices, lecturers involved, educational and teaching materials compiled, the earliest subject syllabus, etc. The evolution of information technology calls for permanent enhancement of professional skills and subsequent updating of continuing education curricula.

 

 

 Professional Knowledge Has always Been Highly Estimated in Librarianship

Krista Talvi

National Library of Estonia, Research and Development Centre, Professional Training

Coordinator

The Estonian Librarians Association, Chairman of the Professional Qualification Commission The system for the recognition of professional qualifications, which in 2001 was brought into compliance with the Professions Act, has been quite successful in librarianship. The body responsible for the award of professional qualifications is the Estonian Librarians' Association (ELA). The Professional Standard III, IV, V established the basic responsibilities, knowledge and skill requirements for librarians.

For conducting professional training, the Librarian III Programme was developed and approved by the resolution of the ELA Board. Special programmes for the IV and V professional levels have not been prepared as yet.

The Professions Committee operating at the ELA includes employees, employers, training providers, representatives of different library types and the ELA plus a non-voting representative of the Estonian Professions Chamber.

Applying for the librarian profession may be performed either on the basis of submitted documents or by taking a professional exam. A special document “The procedure for the award of qualifications” has been developed for this purpose. So far, qualifications have been requested on the basis of submitted documents.

From 2005 to 2010 the III, IV and V professional level has been granted to 774 librarians (level III to 386 librarians; level IV to 364 librarians; level V to 24 librarians). All these librarians were provided with professional certificates.

As the current librarian`s professional standard will be valid until the end of the year 2011, the working team has undertaken to prepare a new professional standard that would be in line with the European Qualifications Framework.

 

 

 Summer Academies Organized by Viljandi Culture Academy

Ilmar Vaaro

University of Tartu Viljandi Culture Academy, Information Studies Department, Lecturer in

Librarianship

The Estonian Librarians Association, Head of the Committee on Education

Ülle Rüütel

Viljandi City Library, Children’s Service Leading Specialist

The Estonian Librarians Association, Head of the Committee on Childresn’s Library Services The article provides an overview of the activities conducted within the framework of the Public Librarians’ Summer Academy established in 2005 at the University of Tartu Viljandi Culture Academy as well as the Summer Academy of Children’s Librarians initiated in 2007.

The Public Librarians’ Summer Academy is mostly attended by public library employees with considerable work experience, who primarily need a more specialized professional training. As many as nine out of the total number of 128 participants have attended the programme every time over six years of activity. The highest number of participants, 62, was registered in 2007.

The greatest emphasis is placed on academically-oriented lectures, which are mostly held by faculty members involved in the culture academy. Lecture topics include: current problems of librarianship, psychology, various areas of information science, tendencies in information technology, librarianship history applications and literature. Lectures are traditionally accompanied by a lively get-acquainted party, excursions associated with Viljandi, outings to other counties, concert visits of the Viljandi Early Music Festival.

The Summer Academy of Children's Librarians programmes have prevalently been attended by librarians working with children, either from public or school libraries.

Participation level has been fairly high, the maximum number of participants reached 42 in 2008. Expectations of librarians are taken into consideration while preparing the study programmes, which have earlier been discussed at the meetings of the children's service working group of the Estonian Librarians Association. Organizers strive to engage lecturers from among renowned experts of their specialties and give preference to professionals, whose lectures have so far not been heard by participants of the Summer Academy. Every summer the subject has comprised topics dealing with contemporary children's literature of various countries, children's and youth cultural issues, databases, psychology.

This form of education tends to create social value in a more effectual way than other types of instruction. It supports establishment of new networks, relations, attitudes, common values and all-important communication of information among people of the same specialty.

 

 

 The History of Public Libraries in Finland

Vesa Kautto

University of Oulu, Principal Librarian, PhD

Review: Suomen yleisten kirjastojen historia / edited by Ilkka Mäkinen. – Helsinki: BTJ, 2009. – 880 p.: ill.– Includes bibliographical references. – Index: p. 872–880.

The history of public libraries in Finland is divided into two sections. The first section is based on the periodic review of the main features. The second section comprises articles about multiple aspects in the activities of libraries: library quarters, information and communication technology in libraries, music libraries in different time periods, libraries in hospitals and other institutions, prison libraries and bookmobiles. Among other topics the book deals with the history of the Finnish Book Club librarianship professional training, the forfeited Karjala's city libraries and indications of left radicalism with regard to the library world in the second half of the 20th century.

Nearly half of the text has been written by an editor of the publication Associate Professor Ilkka Mäkinen. Additionally to Mäkinen it has nine other editors. The book is copiously illustrated with black and white photographic materials.

This review primarily discusses the subject matter of the first section. The Vaasa Reading Society Library, which is regarded the earliest public library in Finland, was founded in 1794. By 1902 the number of public libraries in Finland had increased to nearly 1800. The Folk Education Association (1874– ) and the Finnish Library Association (1910–) made a considerable effort in order to open libraries and enhance their activities. When Finland had gained its independence, the National Central Library Office was founded in 1921 and the first Public Library Act was promulgated in 1928. The following Library Act dated from 1961 and brought along a huge leap forward in the development. The local government libraries in Finland are currently among the front ranking libraries of the world.

From the second section of the book the review introduces articles dealing with library buildings and education for librarianship.

A few drawbacks of the publication are brought out at the end.

 

 

 Laureate of the ELA's Prize for Merits 2010 – Ivi Tingre

Elle Tarik

Tartu Public Library, Librarian

Ivi Tingre (b. 1932) graduated from the State University of Tartu in 1955 with a diploma in art history, but her successive professional career has been involved with librarianship. She proceeded to obtain further education in librarianship at the same university during 1957–1961. In 1957 she started to work as counsellor for library affairs at the Ministry of Culture.

Her employment in that position proceeded until 1992. During her service Ivi Tingre initiated and facilitated a number of influential reorganisations in Estonian librarianship.

Ivi Tingre has served several years on the board of the Estonian Librarians Association. She is an Honorary Member of the ELA since 1996.

In 2010 Ivi Tingre initiated a sub-foundation within the Estonian National Culture Foundation with the aim of supporting the development of library science. To give recognition for her merits pertaining to the advancement of Estonian librarianship, Ivi Tingre was awarded the Order of the White Star 5th class by the President of the Republic of Estonia in 2004.

 

 

 Laureate of the ELA's Annual Prize 2010 – Külli Solo

Ülle Talihärm

National Library of Estonia, Director of Collections

Külli Solo has been working at the Centre of Information Services for MPs in the structure of the National Library of Estonia since 1997. She is currently employed as a chief specialist for compiling bibliographic databases of articles. Being closely familiar with the impact fast finding of articles has on the availability of articles for expeditious using as well as replying to enquiries in reader services, Külli has ardently promoted extensive bibliographic description of articles. Her initiative has led to mapping of the activities pertaining to local bibliography at central and city libraries in Estonia, forming of the ELA working group for local bibliography and introducing of the availability to perform article searching from the article databases of the library information systems URRAM and RIKS through the National Library of Estonia search portal. Külli Solo’s determined efforts towards furthering cooperation between different types of libraries have been truly remarkable and rewarding.

 

 

 Laureate of the Children’s Librarian of the Year 2010 Award – Eve Timmi

Heidi Ratas

Võru County Central Library, Librarian

The Children’s Librarian of the Year 2010 Award was conferred to Eve Timmi, a bibliographer of the Children’s Department of Võrumaa Central Library. The Year Award was bestowed on Eve as a courtesy for her versatile activities oriented toward preschool age children. The Story Saturdays that are held at the library bimonthly were started on her initiative. While listening to the stories to be read out loud, the audience was also given an opportunity to watch an accompanying fingerplay or glove puppet performance. Other kind of enlightening entertainment, e.g. playing games, designing, crafting, drawing, are similarly afforded to children during Literary Mornings. Eve’s good knowledge of children’s literature in combination with her admirable communication ability facilitate attracting children into the library. Furthermore, Eve holds an opinion that if parents fail to bring their younger generation to the library, a librarian would be cheerfully prepared to go and reach out to the kids at the preschools.

 

 

 Laureate of the School Librarian of the Year 2010 Award – Vaike Mändmaa

Eve Rahkema

Tallinn Laagna Gymnasium, Librarian

In choosing a librarian of Pärnu Co-educational Gymnasium Vaike Mändmaa the winner of the Year 2010 Award the determining factors were most probably her multiple-year commitment and contributions to the cause of school libraries. She was among founders of the school library section within the Estonian Librarians Association in 1998 and has continued to take an active role in its work since then. Among other obligations, she has for several years headed this section and in the same way belonged to the ELA Board. At her present place of employment – Pärnu Co-educational Gymnasium, Vaike Mändmaa has turned the school library, previously in a near lethargic state, into a well-functioning combination of a school library and a learning centre. She has established herself as an esteemed staff member of the school, whose advice, guidance and support are sought and appreciated by teachers and students alike.

 

 

 Special Library Deed of the Year 2010 – Founding the Traditional Music Centre Library

Tiina Soopa

Estonian Traditional Music Center Library, Administrator

The Estonian Librarians Association acknowledged with the Special Library Deed of the Year 2010 title the Traditional Music Center Library as an embodiment of a uniquely combined audio repository-library and information center.

The Traditional Music Centre in Viljandi was opened in March 2009. As a public library it is available for all visitors interested in traditional music. The major part of the collection is constituted of unique demo and promotional materials, which have been acquired at music fairs all over the world as well as at the Viljandi Folk Music Festival. Among other items the holdings include sheet music, manuscripts, books and small printed materials

providing an overview about traditional music and related topics.

The website www.folk.ee/teabekogu holds the key role in the every-day use of the reference collection.

Bibliographic data of the traditional music reference collection are accessible for users at the website of the online catalogue URRAM and the global network of digital music archives DISMARC.

 

 

 Research Library Deed of the Year 2010 – Creation of an Electronic Directory for Open Access Collections at Tallinn University of Technology

Rait Aguraijuja

Tallinn University of Technology Library, IT Services Department, System Operator

The creation of an electronic directory for open access collections at Tallinn University of Technology Library was acknowledged by the Estonian Librarians Association with the Research Library Deed of the Year 2010 title. The software version developed at TTU Library is the first solution of its kind in Estonia.

The directory of open access collections serves to offer users an easier, faster and more convenient locating of library items on the open shelves. Introducing described correlations between call numbers and shelves into the system lead to formation of a socalled computerized card catalogue. Whereas the functionality of earlier software versions was limited to searching an item by its subject or call number and subsequent displaying of the corresponding shelf, the issue of this day is interfacing the directory with other information systems and creating several new options for application by that means.

Another improvement worth mentioning is the opportunity to insert rooms, halls, compartments, other locations and objects, thereby expanding the application range of the software and simultaneously generating it into a library guide or an information booth.

 

 

 Activities of the Estonian Librarians Association in 2010

In 2010 the Estonian Librarians Association (ELA) comprised 802 members, incl. Seven honorary members, seven supporting members (institutions) and one foreign member. The Board was composed of eight members: President Anneli Sepp (University of Tartu Library, ELNET Consortium) and members Ave Janu (Vice President, Tallinn University of Technology Library), Vaike Kurel (Old Town Educational College), Helle Laanpere (Central Library of Võru County), Katre Riisalu (Vice President, National Library of Estonia), Taie Saar (Library of Kiili), Asko Tamme (Tartu Public Library) and Õie Tammissaar (Central Library ofLääne-Viru County). The Board held seven meetings, four of them via Skype. All previously working structural units continued their activities and two new working groups – WG on Bibliography of Regional Studies and WG on Library Marketing, were formed.

94 applications for the award of the librarian professional qualification on the basis of submitted documents were received in 2010. The professional level III was granted to 47 librarians, level IV to 38 librarians and level V to one librarian. The Professions Committee rejected granting professional qualification to eight applicants.

Staff members of all library types were given recognition in 2010. With the support of the Cultural Endowment of Estonia, awards were conferred to the Children's Librarian and the School Librarian of the Year, whereas the Deed of the Year was highlighted separately from among research libraries and special libraries. The Best Rural Librarian Award was for the last time granted to the prizewinner of every county (the award will be granted to no more than one rural librarian from 2011 onwards). The ELA also handed out its traditional Prize for Merits and Annual Prize as well as the Bibliography Prize (together with Academic Library of Tallinn University).

The Yearbooks of the Estonian Librarians Association Vol. 20/2008 (compiled by Ave Janu), Vol. 21/2009 (compiled by Elle Tarik) and the 9th Congress of Estonian Librarians Proceedings “Raamatukogu teadmistepõhises ühiskonnas” (Libraries in a Knowledge-based Society) appeared in print.

The journal “Raamatukogu” is jointly published by the National Library of Estonia and the Estonian Librarians' Association, who signed a written agreement regarding publication and dissemination of the journal on February 5, 2010. The contractual obligations of the ELA include finding financial resources for covering the printing costs. The journal was published six times in 2010, incl. a special issue devoted to the Year of Reading, based in part on works submitted to the essay competition on the theme of reading, which had been held by the editorial staff of the journal “Raamatukogu”.

The ELA is an efficient organization with steady membership. The National Year of Reading had also a significant impact on the activities and events of the association in 2010. A meeting with well-known personalities in creative arts, who spoke about the importance of reading in their lives as well as the opening ceremony of the Library Days with speeches addressing the issues of reading and e-books were both attended by large audiences. In the beginning of the year the public was called upon to gift libraries with books. The appeal caught media attention and brought new supporters and friends to libraries. During the Library Days the ELA in co-operation with the news portal Delfi announced a photo competition “Enchanted by Reading”. Three best photos were selected by the jury from among 292 submitted works.

 

 

 ELNET Consortium in 2010

Mare-Nelli Ilus

Consortium of Estonian Libraries Network, Executive Director

2010 was a year of change and dynamic growth for the Estonian Libraries Network

Consortium.

The e-catalogue ESTER was continually among leading issues of broader general interest for member libraries. New products for development of the information system were not purchased in 2010, the efforts were foremost targeted at putting the products that had been acquired during the previous year in working order. The borrowing activity of library users shows a growing tendency – the number of loans, returns and renewals has increased quite similarly.

Negotiations with Innovative Interfaces Inc., the owner company of the Millennium integrated library system were held in connection with Estonia's switch over to the euro.

The greatest part of the Millennium translation project was executed in 2010 – the work was focused on translating the texts displayed to librarians in the cataloguing and lending modules.

Several institutions from outside the consortium membership have expressed their interest towards using the Estonian Subject Thesaurus (EMS), among them a few European Union partnership projects, e.g. EuroTermBank.

With regard to new developments in the Database of Estonian articles Index Scriptorum

Estoniae (ISE) in 2010 mention should be made of converting the existing separate bibliographic databases and uploading the files to the joint database.

Expansive collaboration between libraries is following from the proposal of the ELNET Consortium and the Council of Research Libraries in Estonia to include the object “Estonian e-Repository and Conservation of Collections” in the Estonian Research Infrastructures Roadmap. The objective of the application is to create a common e-environment for retrieval of the digitized resources of Estonian memory institutions and to secure preservation of the collections held by memory institutions. The proposal received positive assessment from the Roadmap working group and the Government of the Republic. Joint discussions and production of documents for investment decision making under preparation were proceeded in 2010.

 

 

 Activities of the Estonian Music Library Association in 2010

Kaie Viigipuu-Kreintaal

Tallinn Central Library, Head of the Music Department

Estonina Music Library Association, President

The Estonian Music Library Association (EMLA) is an organization, whose aim is to promote collaboration between music libraries and to represent their specific music-related interests. The EMLA is the Estonian branch of the IAML (International Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres). In 2010 the EMLA comprised 15 members.

The Board consisted of the following members: Kaie Viigipuu-Kreintaal (President, Tallinn Central Library), Heidi Heinmaa (Secretary-Treasurer, NLE), Avo Kartul (UTL), Ene Roost (Pärnu Central Library), Meery Salu (Tartu Public Library), Ilvi Rauna (Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre Library), Viive Valper (Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir / NYYD Ensemble). Aurika GergeleÅžiu, a founding member and longtime President of the EMLA, has regrettably left the Board. It is hard to overestimate the contributions that she has made to the area of music librarianship throughout Estonia.

During the year members of the association were traditionally convened for two larger meetings. The spring professional training day was conducted together with the General Assembly Meeting on May 12 at Tallinn Central Library. The autumn seminar day was held on October 14 at the National Library of Estonia and was chiefly dedicated to introduction of the new MARC 21 cataloguing instructions.

In 2010 the EMLA continued efforts towards finding a solution to a tangle of problems involved with lending videos for home use. Proposals regarding amendments to the Copyright Act and the producer’s indemnity were submitted to the Minister of Culture in June, directors of central libraries and the ELA concurred with the address. In October, a vaguely phrased response was received in reply, but no substantial debate was subsequently initiated between the interested parties.

The AML annual conference in Moscow was attended by Tedre (EMTA), Katre Riisalu and Heidi Heinmaa (NLE) and Natalja Belotserkovskaja. Heidi Heinmaa presented a paper entitled “The heritage of Peeter Jürgenson in the music collection of the National Library of Estonia” in the Research Libraries Section.

Heidi Heinmaa and Katre Riisalu participated as representatives of the RILM Estonian National Committee in the working meetings of the RILM (Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale), wherein the activity report 2009 was presented.

Ilvi Rauna participated in a workshop “Music in Digital Libraries and Archives” organized in the framework of the International Summer University programme in Stuttgart.